• Less complex modulation. OFDM is a simpler modulation technique that is better suited to deployments that do not require support for mobility.¬†
  • License-exempt bands. Mobile services require licensed spectrum to provide coverage in wide areas. Fixed deployments, however, have often successfully used license-exempt bands in areas where interference levels are acceptable. For this reason, most profiles targeting license-exempt bands are likely to be based on 802.16-2004.
  • Higher throughput. Higher spectrum bands selected for the 802.16-2004 profiles result in higher throughput. This is a clear advantage, especially when targeting enterprise users with higher traffic levels and with CPEs with outdoor antennas.
  • Better time to market. Earlier commercial availability of 802.16-2004 products enables operators to meet the pent-up demand for broadband connectivity in underserved areas, and to start gaining market share ahead of competitors.¬†
  • Better indoor coverage. The better indoor coverage achieved through subchannelization and the AAS option benefits both fixed and mobile applications, because users are often indoors or not within line of sight. However, while outdoor antennas can compensate for limited indoor coverage in fixed deployments, this is clearly not an option for mobile users with a laptop or a PDA.
  • Greater flexibility in managing spectrum resources. Sub-channelization also brings the ability to use network intelligence to allocate resources to user devices as needed. Effectively this results in a more efficient use of spectrum, leading to higher throughput and better indoor coverage, and, in some cases, to lower deployment costs. This is particularly valuable to operators with limited spectrum.
  • Wider range of form factors for user devices. While outdoor and indoor CPEs, and laptop PCMCIA cards are expected to dominate the 802.16-2004 market, laptop PCMCIA cards, mini cards, indoor modems, PDAs, and phones will be available among 802.16e user devices.